COVID-19 Vaccination

The Texas Department of State Health Services has designated The University of Texas at Austin (including UT Health Austin, the clinical practice of the Dell Medical School; the School of Nursing; the College of Pharmacy; the Steve Hicks School of Social Work; University Health Services; and the Office of Campus Safety) a COVID-19 Vaccination site to help protect the health of the greater Austin community. To learn more about how to request a vaccination at UT Health Austin, please visit here.

If you are interested in requesting a vaccination through UT Health Austin, please visit protect.utexas.edu/vaccine for further instruction.

You should not fill out the UT Health Austin online COVID-19 Vaccination Request Form.

Many answers to the questions you have about the COVID-19 vaccination can be found below.

State and Local Vaccination Plans

Vaccination plans for the state of Texas can be found on the Texas Department of State Health Services website here. You can also check your local public health organization for information in your area.

The Texas Department of State Health Services has designated The University of Texas at Austin (including UT Health Austin, the clinical practice of the Dell Medical School; the School of Nursing; the College of Pharmacy; the Steve Hicks School of Social Work; University Health Services; and the Office of Campus Safety) a COVID-19 Vaccination site to help protect the health of the greater Austin community.

UT Health Austin complies with all vaccination criteria as established by the Texas Department of State Health Services. All people ages 12 or older are eligible for a vaccination.

The University of Texas at Austin offers vaccinations to all Texans who meet current eligibility criteria. UT Austin follows all state requirements and guidance regarding distribution and is currently scheduling vaccinations for all people ages 12 or older. UT Austin collects race and ethnicity data to help federal and state officials monitor equitable distribution of vaccine statewide; however, neither race nor ethnicity are used as criteria for registration or scheduling vaccinations.

The University of Texas at Austin is receiving doses based on the Texas Department of State Health Services Vaccine Allocation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have approved the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5-11. The UT School of Nursing’s Family Wellness Center will be the only UT healthcare entity providing this pediatric dose—UT Health Austin and University Health Services will continue to vaccinate individuals ages 12 and older. Appointment scheduling will open in the coming days for children ages 5-11 at the Family Wellness Center once a sufficient supply of the pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been received. Please check the Austin Public Health website and Vaccine Finder to determine additional locations where the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will be available to children ages 5-11.

Requesting a Vaccination

UT Health Austin, the clinical practice of the Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin, is delivering vaccinations to patients ages 12 and older depending on their eligibility status according to the CDC. To request COVID-19 vaccination at UT Health Austin, visit this page.

For all people between the ages of 12 and 17, a parent or guardian must complete the UT Health Austin Minor Consent Form (also available in Spanish) prior to receiving a vaccination. You are required to bring the completed and signed consent form with you to your vaccination appointment.

For all people 80 years of age or older seeking a first or second dose, you do not need to fill out the UT Health Austin online COVID-19 Vaccination Request Form or sign up for a vaccination appointment day and time. At your convenience, you are welcome to visit our vaccination site during regular operating hours (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.). When you arrive at the vaccination site, please proceed to the front of the line.

Current UT Austin students, faculty, and staff should request a vaccination appointment through the university’s Protect Texas Together Form.

Yes, at this time, all COVID-19 vaccinations are available by appointment or walk-in for all people ages 12 and older. Please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form.

For more information on vaccination hours of operation, appointment location, parking, and check-in, please visit here.

If you received a vaccination that requires two doses, it is strongly recommended that you receive your second dose of vaccine at the same site as your first dose. If you have relocated or the site where you received your vaccine is no longer available since receiving your first dose at a location other than UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. It is very important that you keep the vaccine card you were given when you received your first dose of COVID-19 vaccine—taking a photo of your card with your smartphone will ensure that you always have your card with you. Also, please remember that you ONLY sign up to receive a second dose of the same vaccine you received in your first dose.

The same recommendation is true for immunocompromised patients seeking a third dose or those seeking a booster dose. We strongly recommended that you receive your immunocompromised third dose or booster dose at the same site as your second dose. If you have relocated or the site where you received your vaccine is no longer available since receiving your first dose at a location other than UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form.

For example: If you received the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for your first dose, you must receive Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for your second dose. You cannot mix Pfizer and Moderna doses.

Yes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a “mix-and-match” booster dose. Please note, at this time, booster doses are not recommended for individuals under 18 years of age.

For individuals who received a Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are recommended for those who are 18 years of age and older and who were vaccinated 6 months or more after their primary series.

Please note: The Moderna COVID-19 booster dose is half of the dose that is administered for the primary series dose.

For individuals who received the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are also recommended for those who are 18 years of age and older and who were vaccinated two or more months ago.

To receive a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer booster doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to those patients who are 18 years of age and older, and booster doses cannot be administered in less than 6 months following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 2 months following a patient’s initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

All submitted COVID-19 vaccination request forms are reviewed by a UT Health Austin healthcare professional and verified for vaccination eligibility as defined by the Texas Department of State Health Services. Scheduling is dependent upon whether you meet the current eligibility criteria to receive a vaccine as well as vaccine availability.

Once we have received sufficient vaccine to proceed with your appointment, you will receive an email with the subject line “Austin COVID Vaccine Clinic” that includes a link to create an account that will allow you to self-schedule your appointment day and time. When you receive your link from the Austin COVID Vaccine Clinic, please follow these instructions (also available in Spanish) on how to create your account and sign up for your vaccination appointment day and time. We encourage you to check your inbox including your “spam” or “junk” folders regularly as the Austin COVID Vaccine Clinic may not be recognized by your email domain. The email will be sent from this address: noreply@patient-message.com.

If you already created an account, you can return to your portal to finish the self-scheduling process by visiting here. This is also where your will view your appointment day and time after you have self-scheduled as well as where you will view and obtain your vaccination medical record. To save or print your vaccination medical record, please follow these instructions (also available in Spanish).

No, if you choose not to get the COVID-19 vaccination or you have already received your COVID-19 vaccination at another facility, you do not need to notify The University of Texas at Austin. Please disregard your confirmation email and do not sign up for an appointment time and date.

The reply should be automatic. We encourage you to check your “spam,” “junk,” and “deleted” folders, as the reply may not be recognized by your email domain.

Scheduling a Vaccination Appointment

Your insurance information is not required, and you will not be charged for your COVID-19 vaccination. However, the field is required through our scheduling system. Please complete the field with “N/A” or “none.”

You will receive a reminder email from our team with the date and time of your vaccine appointment.

For more information on vaccination hours of operation, appointment location, parking, and check-in, visit here.

Completing a Minor Consent Form (Ages 12-17)

All people between the ages of 12 and 17 are required to bring a completed and signed Minor Consent Form with them to their vaccination appointment.

To access the Minor Consent Form, visit here (also available in Spanish).

No, you do not need your Minor Consent Form signed by your parent or guardian to complete and sign the vaccination request form or to self-schedule your appointment. You are required to bring the completed and signed consent form with you to your vaccination appointment.

To access the Minor Consent Form, visit here (also available in Spanish).

No, if your Minor Consent Form has been completed and signed by your parent or guardian, they do not need to accompany you to your vaccination appointment. You are required to bring the completed and signed consent form with you to your vaccination appointment.

To access the Minor Consent Form, visit here (also available in Spanish).

No, a digital signature cannot be accepted. Your parent or guardian must physically sign your Minor Consent Form.

To access the Minor Consent Form, visit here (also available in Spanish).

You will turn in your Minor Consent Form when you arrive at your vaccination appointment and complete check-in.

For more information about your vaccination appointment, visit here.

If you are unable to print the Minor Consent Form, your parent or guardian must accompany you to your appointment. A Minor Consent Form will be provided at your vaccination appointment check-in and your parent or guardian will be required to complete the form at that time.

Vaccination Efficacy and Safety

No, COVID-19 vaccines do not contain the live virus. They can trigger an immune response, which is normal. This reaction may include typical body responses, such as pain at the injection site, chills, headache, fever, and muscle pain. More information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, the United States vaccine safety system ensures all vaccines are as safe as possible.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, people who have experienced severe reactions to prior vaccines or injectable drugs can still get the vaccine for COVID-19, but should discuss the risks with their healthcare provider and be monitored for 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine. If you have been prescribed injectable epinephrine, please bring it with you to your appointment.

Vaccines are designed to elicit a slight immune response, so experiencing some side effects is normal. According to the Food and Drug Administration website here, the most common side effects include pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site as well as fatigue, headache, chills, muscle pain, and joint pain. Side effects may vary by person.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, your body’s response to the vaccine may include a sore arm, fever, chills, headache, and muscle pain. This is a normal response of your immune system and typically goes away after 2 days. You can take acetaminophen or ibuprofen to alleviate these symptoms. If side effects persist for more than 48 hours, please contact your doctor or visit your local clinic.

You can learn more about the differences between the COVID-19 vaccines currently available and those in development by visiting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here.

To learn more about COVID-19 vaccines, please click the Manufacturer Product Information link on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here.

Vaccination and Immunocompromised Individuals

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, a third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, such as the Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine, is recommended for eligible immunocompromised people.

According to CDC guidelines, eligible immunocompromised individuals include:

  • Those receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Those taking medicine to suppress the immune system following an organ or stem cell transplant
  • Those who are actively being treated with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress the immune response
  • Those who are immunocompromised because of an illness, such as DiGeorge Syndrome or Wiskott- Aldrich Syndrome, or an advanced or untreated HIV infection

To receive an immunocompromised third dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer third doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to immunocompromised patients (mixing vaccine sources is not advised), and third doses cannot be administered in less than 28 days following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Immunocompromised patients (per the CDC here) must wait at least 28 days from the time of receiving their second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, such as the Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine, before they can receive a third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

To receive an immunocompromised third dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer third doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to immunocompromised patients (mixing vaccine sources is not advised), and third doses cannot be administered in less than 28 days following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

For example: If you received the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for your first two doses, you must receive Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for your third dose. Immunocompromised individuals cannot mix Pfizer and Moderna doses.

Mixing vaccine sources is not advised. If possible, return to the vaccination site where you received your Moderna COVID-19 vaccination or speak with your primary care physician about scheduling an appointment to receive a third dose of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. You can also schedule an appointment through Austin Public Health or check with your local pharmacy. Many pharmacies and some grocers, including HEB, now offer vaccines by appointment or on a walk-in basis.

UT Health Austin will only offer third doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to immunocompromised patients.

Yes, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, a third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, such as the Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine, is recommended for eligible immunocompromised children (ages 12-17).

To schedule an immunocompromised third dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer third doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to immunocompromised patients (mixing vaccine sources is not advised), and third doses cannot be administered in less than 28 days following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

The third dose for immunocompromised individuals is intended to increase immunity not mounted by the first two doses received. For more information, please contact your primary care provider or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here

For specific questions, please contact your primary care provider or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here. Best practice would be to wait until quarantine is over and 28 days past your second dose.

Booster Vaccinations

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a “mix-and-match” booster dose. Please note, at this time, booster doses are not recommended for individuals under 18 years of age.

For individuals who received a Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are recommended for those who are 18 years of age and older and who were vaccinated 6 months or more after their primary series:

Please note: The Moderna COVID-19 booster dose is half of the dose that is administered for the primary series dose.

For individuals who received the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are also recommended for those who are 18 years of age and older and who were vaccinated two or more months ago.

To receive a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer booster doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to those patients who are 18 years of age and older, and booster doses cannot be administered in less than 6 months following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 2 months following a patient’s initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

Patients who received their first two doses of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine and meet eligibility criteria (per the CDC here) must wait at least 6 months from the time of receiving their second dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine before they can receive a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Patients who received a dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine and meet eligibility criteria (per the CDC here) must wait at least 2 months from the time of receiving their initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine before they can receive a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

To receive a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine through UT Health Austin, please visit our COVID-19 Vaccination page and select the appropriate registration form. UT Health Austin will only offer booster doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to those patients who meet eligibility criteria, and booster doses cannot be administered in less than 6 months following a patient’s second dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 2 months following a patient’s initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

No, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is not currently recommended for children (ages 12-17).

For specific questions, please contact your primary care provider or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here. Best practice would be to wait until quarantine is over and 6 months past your second dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 2 months past your initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

Yes, you are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after receiving your second dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. However, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection, especially among certain populations, against mild and moderate disease.

In addition to considering a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, it is also recommended that you continue wearing a face mask and maintaining personal safety and distancing measures to reduce your risk of exposure and/or transmission as much as possible.

For more information, please contact your primary care provider or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here

No, COVID-19 vaccines are working well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. However, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection, especially among certain populations, against mild and moderate disease.

In addition to considering a booster dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, it is also recommended that you continue wearing a face mask and maintaining personal safety and distancing measures to reduce your risk of exposure and/or transmission as much as possible.

For more information, please contact your primary care provider or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here

A booster shot is administered when a person has completed their vaccine series and protection against the virus has decreased over time. Additional doses are administered to people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems. This additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine is intended to improve immunocompromised people’s response to their initial vaccine series.

Vaccination and Women’s Health

There are some concerns about menstrual irregularities that have been anecdotally (by means of personal accounts rather than based in science or research) associated with the vaccine. Menstrual irregularities are known to be associated with stress, illness, obesity, and other metabolic disorders, but have not been studied in the clinical trials.

There is no evidence that the vaccine can lead to loss of fertility. Though fertility was not specifically studied in the clinical trials of the vaccine, no loss of fertility has been reported among trial participants or among the millions of people who have received the vaccines. There are unfounded rumors that the vaccine can lower sperm counts and that it includes a protein that can prevent implantation, but these are myths that are not based in science or research.

Since none of the vaccine currently available contain any live virus, they are all expected to be safe in pregnancy. Pregnant women are at high risk for having severe disease if they get infected with the coronavirus and should be prioritized to receive the vaccine. The vaccine is recommended for women who are pregnant as well as women contemplating pregnancy to minimize risk to themselves and their pregnancy. We do not recommend withholding the vaccine from these patients or from patients who are currently breastfeeding. All available data shows that the vaccine does not increase your risk for miscarriage or other pregnancy complications.

Yes, when you are pregnant or breastfeeding, the antibodies your body produces in response to receiving a vaccine can be passed on and provide your baby with short-term protection from potentially harmful diseases.

Getting the Vaccination

All people ages 12 or older are eligible for a vaccination. To request a COVID-19 vaccination at UT Health Austin, visit here.

For all people between the ages of 12 and 17, a parent or guardian must complete the UT Health Austin Minor Consent Form (also available in Spanish) prior to receiving a vaccination. You are required to bring the completed and signed consent form with you to your vaccination appointment.

For all people 80 years of age or older seeking a first or second dose, you do not need to request a vaccination. At your convenience, you are welcome to visit our vaccination site during regular operating hours (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.). When you arrive at the vaccination site, please proceed to the front of the line.

Current UT Austin students, faculty, and staff should request a vaccination appointment through the university’s Protect Texas Together Form.

The number of doses depends on which vaccine you receive. Some vaccines, such as the Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine, require two doses, which are administered several weeks apart. When you are vaccinated, your provider should let you know which vaccine you’re getting and what follow-up is required.

Booster shots are now available for eligible patients 6 months after they received their 2nd dose of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 2 months after an eligible patient has received their initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

The needle used to administer the vaccine is very thin and many UT Health Austin clinicians and clinical staff who have been vaccinated report getting the vaccine is not bad at all; some even say it hurts less than getting the flu shot.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, people who have had COVID-19 may still benefit from getting the vaccine. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection is possible, people may be advised to get the vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before.

Post-Vaccination

You can return to your portal that was created when you registered and self-scheduled your vaccination appointment by visiting here. This is where you will view and obtain your vaccination medical record. To save or print your vaccination medical record, please follow these instructions (also available in Spanish).

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, digital photos of your vaccination card and downloaded vaccine records are acceptable forms of proof of COVID-19 vaccination for travel.

Patients under the age of 13 will not have access to their portal after receiving their first dose of vaccination. At the time of their first-dose vaccination appointment, they will have an opportunity to transfer their portal access to their parent or legal guardian. If the portal access is transferred, the parent or legal guardian can create a portal account on behalf of the patient or the patient can be added to the parent or legal guardian’s portal account. If the portal access is not transferred, the patient’s record will remain secure and properly documented in the UT Health Austin system. Whether the portal access is transferred or not, the patient will receive an email notification indicating that their portal access was deleted. Learn more here.

You can return to your portal that was created when you registered and self-scheduled your vaccination appointment by visiting here. This is where you will view and obtain your vaccination medical record. To save or print your vaccination medical record, please follow these instructions (also available in Spanish).

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, digital photos of your vaccination card and downloaded vaccine records are acceptable forms of proof of COVID-19 vaccination for travel.

Patients under the age of 13 will not have access to their portal after receiving their first dose of vaccination. At the time of their first-dose vaccination appointment, they will have an opportunity to transfer their portal access to their parent or legal guardian. If the portal access is transferred, the parent or legal guardian can create a portal account on behalf of the patient or the patient can be added to the parent or legal guardian’s portal account. If the portal access is not transferred, the patient’s record will remain secure and properly documented in the UT Health Austin system. Whether the portal access is transferred or not, the patient will receive an email notification indicating that their portal access was deleted. Learn more here.

First, you should contact your healthcare provider. Then, you should visit Report an Adverse Event on the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) website and follow the instructions to fill out the VAERS online form or downloadable PDF. You may also report your reaction through V-safe. V-safe is a smartphone-based tool created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that uses text messaging and web surveys to provide personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Through v-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Information on how to register for V-safe can be found here.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, fully vaccinated people can resume activities without wearing a mask or social distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here, it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination.

If you received a vaccination that requires two doses and are currently waiting for your second dose, you can continue practicing COVID-19 preventive measures. For patients who are not fully vaccinated or have weakened immune systems, masking, while optional, is recommended. For patients concerned about the possibility of exposure in a setting where masks are not mandated, virtual visits are encouraged where feasible.

While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, such as covering your mouth and nose with a mask, washing your hands often, and staying at least 6 feet away from others. Learn more by visiting frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccination on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website here.

Research is ongoing about how long vaccine immunity lasts. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that researchers are still learning about. We will monitor CDC research and follow their guidance in the provision of vaccines.

To explore more FAQs about the COVID-19 vaccination, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website here.

To explore more FAQs about The University of Texas at Austin’s COVID-19 vaccination plan, visit the Protect Texas Together website here.